Why British journalists are taught to be dishonest

By Laurie Penny.
New Statesman, 25 January 2012

The first thing I learned in journalism school was not to say anything bad about the police. If I did, even if I’d seen abuses of power with my own eyes, I could face a suit for damages that would ruin me, my editors and whatever paper had been unfortunate enough to publish my work.

Nick Cohen’s new treatise on censorship, You Can’t Read This Book, airs one of the more painful secrets of the British press – the slide, especially over the last 15 years, towards a culture where archaic libel laws give the wealthy and privileged “the power to enforce a censorship that the naive supposed had vanished with the repressions of the old establishment.”

I recently spent some time in the United States, where the cultural attitude to freedom of the press is rather different. A country that produced Fox News and allows presidential attack ads to run on television can hardly be held up as a gold standard for fair and unbiased reporting, but if American journalism lacks deference, British journalism is crippled by a surfeit of it.
Carry on reading

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5 thoughts on “Why British journalists are taught to be dishonest

  1. Wow, love those greens! She deentiifly has a regal smile and she is actually very regal looking. Speaking of your book, I will be ordering it from Amazon when it comes out. I may order two, one for my mom and one for me.

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