The New Inquisition in Pakistan

After Salman Rushdie published The Satanic Verses, religious “scholars” doubted whether the Ayatollah Khomeini had the right to order his murder. They had no liberal qualms about executing a writer for subjecting religion to imaginative scrutiny. They believed that blasphemers and apostates must die as their religion insisted. But only if they were citizens of an Islamic state. As Rushdie was living in London in 1989, a free man in a free country, the clerics concluded that religious law did not apply to him.

The Rushdie controversy was the Dreyfus affair of the late 20th century. It established today’s dividing lines between the secular and the authoritarian, between those who were willing to defend freedom of thought and inquiry and those who wanted to censor and self-censor to keep fanatics happy. We can gauge how low we have sunk by remembering that at the start of the battle 23 years ago there was a tiny regard for the forms of legality, even among those who were otherwise happy to condemn free thinkers to death. However brutal they were, they respected their version of due process.

The Islamist murders first of Salmaan Taseer and then of Shahbaz Bhatti show that what tiny scruples blood-soaked men possessed vanished long ago.
Carry on reading

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One thought on “The New Inquisition in Pakistan

  1. I have just read this piece in parallel in the Guardian/Observer on “Not Blasphemy” in Pakistan – spot on.
    BUT
    I’m writing direct to you, because, like those who supported Rushdie, I am BANNED from commenting in the Guardian/Observer.
    As an atheist (and member of the NSS) I referred to islam as a “cruel intolerent and mediaval religion.”
    I was promptly banned for “racism”, and AFAIK, that ban still holds.

    Comment is NOT free, and the Guardian’s editorial staff are hypocrites.

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