The west has a duty to intervene in Syria

The Syrian revolution is a motherless child. The “international community”, so vigorous in its declarations of support for human rights, does nothing to protect it. Assad’s state terrorists have unrestrained freedom to murder, rape and nail-bomb protesters and abuse and castrate children.

To grasp the scale of the barbarism, listen to Hamza Fakher, a pro-democracy activist, who is one of the most reliable sources on the crimes the regime’s news blackout hides. “The repression is so severe that detainees are stacked alive and kicking in shipping containers and disposed off in the middle of the sea,” he told me. “It is so bad that they’ve invented a new way of torture in Aleppo where they heat a metal plate and force a detainee to stand on it until he confesses; imagine all the melting flesh reaching the bone before the detainee falls on the plate. It is so bad that all demonstrators have opted for armed resistance. They know it is about survival now, not about freedom any more. This needs to be highlighted: Syrians are fighting for their lives now, not for freedom.”
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2 Comments to “The west has a duty to intervene in Syria”

  1. again, just a quick point of clarification:One thing you want to enagcruoe is people being able to register as supporters of one of the parties, and hence able to vote in the primary, without having to be member/activist of the party as such.Yes, I agree, LO, and that’s what I understand Labor to have done in Victoria. That’s what I’d like to see, or something akin to it.Also, on your last point, Tony Blair became PM with overwhelming support from the members’ component of the electoral college despite being a non-traditional candidate who probably would not have been the first pick of MPs had the previous election by caucus method been in place. I think in debating this we have to take into account that an electoral college system, in the UK, involved raising the number of party members by a large factor, and short-circuited the influence of various party and union bosses. If the mode of selecting candidates and leaders changed, the incentives to become a party member or register as a supporter would also shift, and all this would affect the dynamics and nature of power structures within the party.

  2. As the owner of many of Bob Dorr’s books, I have come to expect that annhtiyg he produces will be well-researched, well-presented, and very well-written. Hell Hawks! is right up there not only with Dorr’s other works but with the best in Be There combat writing. Here’s an example: The German pilot ran flat-out low threading the needle between a church steeple and tall brick smokestack. Narrow streets raced under the wings of Kraman’s P-47 as he engaged the throttle button triggering emergency water injection. His Pratt & Whitney surged as Kraman squeezed off short bursts at his quarry, the enemy banking abruptly left and right to throw off the American’s aim. Across the Rhine, farther into Germany, the pair raced east Dorr and co-author Thomas D. Jones (USAF Academy grad, ex-B-52 driver, veteran of four NASA space shuttle flights) also rightly recognize the guys who weren’t strapping into the 365th Fighter Group’s P-47s: The men with stripes on their arms didn’t pilot Jugs, but they made warfare in the Jug possible. We tend to forget that the aircraft of WW II, after all, were just 15 years removed from Lindbergh’s Ryan NYP of 1927 but were very complex machines. The authors salute the men with the stripes well. The results of close to 200 interviews of 365th FG veteans, other combat vets, family members, and more, plus four years of research, Hell Hawks! is loaded with the day-to-day details of fighting a tenaciously fierce enemy, demonstrating throughout the book that ground attack combat was a deadly way to earn your flight pay. The authors bring the personalities of the young pilots alive as well as provide a big picture of Allied strategy and the pace of war from D-Day to victory. This is an excellent book not only for military historians but for anyone who enjoys aviation writers at the top of their game. Splendid!

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